Tag Archives: snow geese

Equipment Checklist – Guided Snow Goose Hunt

 

  • rubber boot, hip boots or chest waders
  • wool socks
  • Missouri nonresident small game hunting license (available online or over the counter)
  • Missouri  Conservation Action Licenses hunting license (available online or over the counter)
  • hunters education certificate (Required of those born on or after Jan. 1, 1967)
  • shotgun
  • steel shotgun shells (BB’s and BBB’s)
  • camouflaged clothing
  • camouflaged face mask, or stocking hat face mask
  • warm camouflage hat with ear protection
  • gloves
  • long underwear
  • hand heat packs
  • raingear
  • camera
  • cooler for meat transport

Guided Snow Goose Hunts In Mound City, Missouri – Lodging Available

Dates are filling up fast for our  spring snow goose season.  Come hunt with the friendliest, most ethical, savviest guides in the snow goose business.

Whether you’re a novice or veteran waterfowler, spring snow geese provide an experience like no other! No limit, no plug, electronic calls, lots of shooting.

We are now offering lodging, clean beds, shower, full kitchen available for use. $30 per night. MEALS not included.

We are a local group of guys with an unsurpassed passion for hunting snow geese, day in and day out our clients go home happy and tired! Hunts start mid-February thru mid-March so the season is short and the birds are many. Contact Scott @ 855 473-2875 or check out our website www.snowgoosechasers.com

Stacking Them Up In 2012 – Snow Goose Hunting – Mound City, Missouri

Another day of hunting snow geese at Mound City, Missouri. The morning hunt produced some decent decoy action however with large feeding flocks both North and East of Squaw Creek and a great deal of older birds it is best NOT to wait on a second pass to shoot the snows. a great policy to implement is a shoot them on the first pass over the decoys.

Fully Guided Spring Snow Goose Hunts - Mound City, Missouri - Squaw Creek

Fully Guided Spring Snow Goose Hunts - Mound City, Missouri - Snow Goose Chasers

Corned Beef Snow Goose Breast

Ingredients:
6 to 8 goose breast filets (4 to 6 lbs)

5 tablespoons Morton Tenderquick mix

2 tablespoons brown sugar

1 tablespoon ground black pepper

1 teaspoon ground paprika

1 teaspoon ground bay leaves

1 teaspoon ground allspice

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

Trim, skin, and clean up breast filets (or beef brisket or boneless cut of deer, elk, etc)
In a small bowl, mix Morton Tender Quick and remaining dry ingredients and spices (DO NOT SubstituteAny “MeatTenderizer” For Morton TenderQuick)

Thoroughly rub mixture into all sides of breast filets.

Place filets into a plastic bag and close securely. Place in refrigerator and allow to cure 5 days per inch of meat thickness (a week seems to work fine for goose breasts) Place filets in pot and add water to cover. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat. Simmer until tender, about 3 hours

Availability All Season – Fully Guided Snow Goose Hunts – Heated Pit Blind – Squaw Creek NWR – Mound City, Missouri

Key Questions To Know and Ask

  • How Many Committed Hunters Are In Your Group?
  • What Dates Would You Like To Hunt?
  • 50% Deposit Required To Reserve Your Spots
  • Limited Lodging Is Available In Mound City
  • Historically The Best Dates In The Squaw Creek / Mound City, Missouri Area Are March 1 – 21
  • Conservation Action License – Hunter Education or Apprentice License Require

Missouri conservation License - Spring Snow Goose Season

Special

Snow Goose Chasers  – Mound City, Missouri

(855) 473-2875
$200 per hunter/ per day – Hunt / Lodging
Layout Ground Blinds / Heated Pit Blind-Missouri
 Call NOW before we are booked!

February 15 – March 21

855-473-2875

Premium Package 1 – Spring Snow Goose Hunt 

 full day hunt

fully guided field hunt

  • $175.00 per hunter / per day.

We provide all equipment, blinds, callers, decoys(800 – 1500) Full Body Decoys (GHG, Avery, Bigfoot, ect. ) 10 -75 Silosock Flyers. Also silosocks, shell decoys and floaters if needed. We do everything you just show up and hunt.

BROCHURE

Decoy Spreads Available

  • 1000 full body decoys, 500 sillosocks, over 30 flyers – cornfield
  • 1500 Sillosocks, up 50 flyers – to go spread (go where the snow goose are at)
  • 750 shells decoys (Avery 5/8s, full size, and motion shells) 300 – 500 sillo socks- pit blind style
  • over 15 location that we can hunt in the Mound City / Squaw Creek NWR area

Package 2 – Fully Guided – Heated Pit Blind  – Less than one mile from Squaw Creek NWR – 1000 full body Avery decoys, flyers, E-callers, vortex machines

 $250 per hunter / per day.Guided Snow Goose Hunts - Mound City, Missoiuri - 855-473-2875

Top 5 reasons to book your hunt with us this season!

1. All of our hunts take place over Avery & Bigfoot full body goose decoys, 5/8 Avery Snow Goose Shells and Sillo Sock Decoys.

2. We have 10 years of Spring Snow Goose hunting experience and we live here. We know where the geese are and we will do our absolute best to put you on them.

3. We hunt all day and are in the most predominant flyway in the United States.

4. 1000’s of  geese killed in the past 10 year.

5. We want you to have the best hunting experience as possible. Your success is our business!

Snow Geese – The Snow Storm on the Prairie

The snow geese fall from the sky like pelting snowflakes of a winter blizzard. Thousands blanket the ground already, but hundreds more fly in to join them.

“It’ll be difficult competing with a flock that big,” the snow goose hunting guide says. “But some should fly over us on their way to that flock, and maybe we can coax them into our little spread of goose decoys instead.”

“Little” does not accurately describe the group of goose decoys in which we lay. There are more than 1,000 goose decoys, including full-body models and white trash bags draped over soybean stalks to imitate a flock of snow geese.

The snow goose hunting guide is correct, nevertheless. It will be hard to coax birds their way when 10,000 live, calling snow geese are feeding nearby.

In many parts of their wintering range, it’s possible to see thousands of snow geese each day.

For the first hour after dawn, the goose hunter  lies on a sheet of plywood in the field and watch as geese skirt our spread to land with the flock. The scene seems surreal—eight goose hunters wearing long white smocks and white toboggans laying amidst 1,000 trash bags. It looks like a late-season Halloween with everyone dressed as ghosts.

In the distance, the goose hunter finally see snow geese making a bee-line their way. Their snow goose hunting guide sees them, too.

“Wave your flag!” the snow goose hunting guide calls. His partner raises a white flag on a long pole and begins waving it.

The snow geese come straight on. At 100 yards, they cup their wings and begin swinging back and forth in the air. The snow goose hunting guide and his partner lower their flags and begin goose calling with tube calls.

Too late the birds realize the ruse. “Now!” the snow goose hunting guide shouts. A barrage of shots rings out. The goose hunter swings on a white bird and fires, then swings again and shoots a blue. The snow geese hit the ground with hard thumps as the goose hunter tries unsuccessfully to get another bird in his sights.

When it’s over, the goose hunter realizes he is shaking. Excitement does that to some hunters, and this snow goose hunting certainly is exciting.

The snow goose hunting guides gather the snow geese while the goose hunters chide each other on shots missed. The shooting has stirred them. They’re ready for another flurry.

The winter staging of snow geese in the South is one of the world’s most incredible wildlife spectacles. In prime snow geese hunting areas, it’s not unusual to see tens of thousands of snow geese daily.

The synchronicity of their movements is unforgettable: skeins of white, some more than a mile long, highlighted against bluebird skies or black thunderheads as the birds ride the towering wash of winter winds. Mere inches separate the individuals, yet one never touches another.

Snow geese once were much less common in this region, but populations mushroomed in the 1990s as winter wheat plantings expanded. Biologists now worry that snow geese are so numerous they’re deteriorating breeding-ground habitat in the far north.

Despite the abundance of geese, however, there still are relatively few serious goose hunters in most Southern states. Some duck hunters have switched part of their attention to snow geese, but it’s still a fledgling sport in many areas, and for the most part, the vast flocks of birds go about their daily business with little attention from hunters.

Keys To Snow Goose Hunting Success

There’s no such thing as a casual snow goose hunt, one reason many goose hunters don’t participate. This sport requires huge goose decoy spreads and a substantial investment of time and effort.

First, you must study movement patterns of geese where you want to goose hunt, then secure permission to goose hunt where concentrations are located. (Most goose hunting is on private lands.) When geese start using a field, they stay until the food supply is exhausted. Being there after they’ve started using the field and before they’ve eaten it out is the trick.

Hundreds of goose decoys are needed to attract the birds. Most goose hunters use commercially manufactured goose decoys supplemented with white trash bags or cardboard silhouettes. When the spread is arranged, the goose hunters, in dressed snow-camo clothes or white smocks, lay down right in the goose decoys. A waving white flag creates movement in the spread. This and good goose calling attract the birds’ attention and draw them near.

Guns and Snow Goose Hunting Guides

Don’t go in undergunned. Use a 10-gauge or a magnum 12-gauge with large shot. Nontoxic shot is mandatory everywhere, and most goose hunters opt for sizes BB, BBB or T.

If you’re new to the sport, consider hiring a snow goose hunting guide. These guys can show you the ins and outs of snow goose hunting, and after you’ve experienced a hunt first-hand, you’ll know whether you really want to make the required investment in time and equipment to hunt on your own. Best of all, snow goose hunting guides do all the work. The goose hunter need not spend hours scouting, gaining hunting permission and setting and retrieving goose decoys. For a reasonable fee, reputable snow goose hunting guides do all this and clean and pack your birds, too.

Although snow goose hunting is a time consuming, it’s a sport many of us find irresistibly attractive. Snow goose hunting allows you to perfect your skills with a shotgun and to go afield with men we enjoy and admire. But most of all, it gives you another excuse to be outdoors on those cold days in January and February when common sense dictates it might be best to stay home. Until you have laid in a goose decoy spread beneath a sky full of living snowflakes, you have missed one of hunting’s greatest pleasures.

Snow Goose Stew with Barley and Mushrooms

This is a hearty stew inspired by some similar Russian stews I’ve come across over the years. I imagine it to be something eaten in Siberia, or on Wrangel Island, where many of California’s snow geese spend their summers. I used snow geese in this recipe, but the dish would work with all sorts of meats: other geese, ducks, jackrabbit or hare, muskrats, venison — and yes, domestic beef or lamb.

I also used wild yellowfoot mushrooms, which can be hard to find. If you have access to a fancy supermarket, buy them, or buy beech mushrooms. If that’s not an option, any fresh mushroom will do. Don’t have celery root? Use potatoes. No barley? Rye or wheat berries would also work, although rye takes a long time to cook. No duck fat? Use lard or butter. No duck stock? Use beef stock.

This stew keeps well in the fridge for a week, and it freezes well.

Serves 6-8.

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 3 hours

  • 8 goose legs, about 2-3 pounds
  • 3 tablespoons duck fat, lard or butter
  • 1 large onion, sliced, about 3 cups
  • 1 pound yellowfoot chanterelles, beech mushrooms or other mushrooms
  • 7 cups duck stock or beef stock
  • 2 teaspoons marjoram
  • 1 cup barley
  • 1 cup sliced carrots
  • 1 celery root, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon sour cream per person

 

  1. Heat the duck fat in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat and brown the goose legs well. Salt them as they cook. Remove the goose legs as they brown and set aside.
  2. Once the goose legs are all browned, add the onions and mushrooms and turn the heat to high. Stir to combine. Saute until the onion begins to brown, about 6-8 minutes. Add the marjoram and return the goose legs to the pot, then pour over the duck stock. Bring to a simmer and cook until the goose legs are tender, anywhere from 1 hour to 3 hours.
  3. When the goose legs are tender, remove them, let them cool a bit, and pull all the meat off the bone. Return it to the pot. Add the barley, carrots and celery root. Stir well and cook until the barley and celery root are cooked, about 30 minutes. Add salt to taste.
  4. Serve garnished with dill and black pepper, and give everyone a dollop of sour cream on their bowls when you come to the table.

More Spring Snow Goose Hunting Tips – Mound City, Missouri

  • When hunting snow geese, the more calls you have the better. Try using two electronic calls plus your mouth call.
  • Nebraska, Iowa, Northwest Missouri, South Dakota and North Dakota are some of the most popular states for spring snow goose hunting.
  • Gun Loads (for 12-Guages): 3-inch BB, BBB, or T-Shot in steel. In Bismuth and Tungsten, BBs and 2s are the loads of choice.
  • Choke: improved to full, depending on how your gun patterns with the large loads.
  • Call your state Wildlife Agency for general information on season dates, regulations, and snow goose staging areas.
  • For detailed tips on hunting spring snows, check out Ron Spomer’s article, “Strategies for Spring Snows,” in the Jan./Feb. issue of DU Magazine.
  • Decoying: Most guides use 1,000 or more decoys, but if you aren’t going with a guide, 400 to 600 decoys will do the trick.
  • Arrange decoys in a teardrop shape, large at one end and small at the other with your blind in the center.
  • If the geese aren’t coming all the way to your decoys, switch from white clothes to camouflage and set up 100 yards downwind of your decoys.
  • Scouting is key. Try to hunt a field that birds were in the night before.
  • Flags and wind socks add movement to a decoy spread. Some hunters also use black and white balloons attached to poles to create the same effect.