Tag Archives: cooking

Red Curry Snow Goose

  • 2 lbs diced bite size Snow Goose Meat
  • 2 Cloves Garlic
  • 1 Tablespoon mashed ginger
  • 1 sliced shallot
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoon thai red curry
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • mix vegtables of snow peas, baby corn, and bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped green onions
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro
  • Lime wedges
  • salt to taste
    In a large pan, add oil and turn burner to high. Add your goose meat, garlic, ginger, salt and shallot together and stir til the meat is cooked around. Turn burner to medium and add Curry paste and mixed vegetables. After 2 minutes, add coconut milk and let simmer for 15 minutes. Add your cilantro and green onions at last minute and then squeeze lime wedges to taste. Serve over steamed jasmine rice or brown rice.

Corned Beef Snow Goose Breast

Ingredients:
6 to 8 goose breast filets (4 to 6 lbs)

5 tablespoons Morton Tenderquick mix

2 tablespoons brown sugar

1 tablespoon ground black pepper

1 teaspoon ground paprika

1 teaspoon ground bay leaves

1 teaspoon ground allspice

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

Trim, skin, and clean up breast filets (or beef brisket or boneless cut of deer, elk, etc)
In a small bowl, mix Morton Tender Quick and remaining dry ingredients and spices (DO NOT SubstituteAny “MeatTenderizer” For Morton TenderQuick)

Thoroughly rub mixture into all sides of breast filets.

Place filets into a plastic bag and close securely. Place in refrigerator and allow to cure 5 days per inch of meat thickness (a week seems to work fine for goose breasts) Place filets in pot and add water to cover. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat. Simmer until tender, about 3 hours

CARIBBEAN SNOW GOOSE

2 lbs. snow goose meat, sliced ½” thick

2 c. orange

6 tsp. green onion, finely chopped

½ c. rice wine 1 tsp. crushed red pepper

4 tsp. brown sugar 1 tsp. cloves

2 tsp. nutmeg Salt to taste

2 tsp. allspice

To make marinade: mix together orange juice, rice wine, brown sugar, green onion, nutmeg, allspice, red pepper, salt and cloves. Divide in half. Use half to marinate the goose meat for 2-4 hours.

Remove meat from marinade. Grill goose on medium-high barbecue until cooked to medium rare.

Cook the other half of the marinade in a saucepan on medium heat until it forms a thick sauce. Serve as a hot dip for the grilled meat

Snow Goose Kabobs

One of the largest segments of waterfowl is the snow goose. With very liberal bag limits taking lots of birds for consumption is easy. Most hunters make these into sausages and or jerky, however they are also very tasty especially on the BBQ. Fresh goose breasts are used in this Snow Goose Recipe.  Caution do not overcook waterfowl, it dries out quickly and very easy.

INGREDIENTS:

4 – 8 goose breasts (1 – 2 breasts per person)
¼ cup pure maple syrup
¼ cup Worcestershire sauce
½ bottle Italian salad dressing
½ tsp seasoning salt
½ tsp black pepper
Fresh Vegetables: cherry tomatos, green & red pepper, onion, mushrooms
DIRECTIONS:
Cut goose breasts into ½ inch sized  cubes.
Place cubes in a zip-top bag, or vacuum-sealed bag.  Add all remaining ingredients except vegetables. Mix thoroughly.  Refrigerate mixture for 24 hours. Cut vegetables for kabobs and preheat grill to medium heat.  Place meat and vegetables on skewers cook until meat is medium rare.

NOTES:
The marinated meat can be frozen in marinade and taken out prior to eating.
Using a vacuum sealer can speed the marinating process.

Duck or Goose Prosciutto

Duck or goose prosciutto is an old Italian tradition that originated in the country’s Jewish community, for whom regular prosciutto was forbidden. The process was designed for domestic ducks and geese, and by all means use this recipe for those critters if you’d like.

But air-cured wild goose breasts (most wild duck breasts will be too small to really do this recipe justice), are something special. Slice it as thin as you can on the diagonal and serve it with melon, figs, good cheese, on top of a fried egg, with bruschetta — you get the point.

I will give you two recipes: One for a “sweet” cure, the other for a spicy one. This is what I do when I want to make Italian-style goose prosciutto: You can mess around with the spices as you wish, but until you do this a few times, don’t change the amount of salt and sugar.

The sweet cure needs watching as it dries — it is more prone to mold than the spicy variety. Remember that white, powdery mold is OK, white fuzzy is not harmful but should be wiped off, green fuzzy needs to be wiped off the moment you spot it, and black mold is bad: I toss the breast if I get the black stuff. When sketchy mold does appear, I wipe it off every other day with a paper towel soaked in red wine vinegar.

How long to cure? From 2-6 weeks, depending on the size of the breasts and the amount of fat and the temperature and the humidity. Suffice to say you need to watch it every other day or so.

Once the goose prosciutto is cured, you can eat it straight away or wrap it and store it in the fridge. It also freezes well for a year or more.

SWEET GOOSE PROSCIUTTO

Makes 2 slabs of cured goose breast.

Prep Time: 30 days

  • 1 goose breast or domestic duck breast, both halves (skin on)
  • 3/4 cup  kosher salt or pickling salt
  • 1/4 cup  sugar
  • 2 tablespoons  garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon  ground fennel seed
  • 1 tablespoon  ground white pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon  ground clove
  • 1/2 teaspoon  grated nutmeg

 

SPICY GOOSE PROSCIUTTO

Makes 2 slabs of cured goose breast.

Prep Time: 30 days

  • 1 goose breast or domestic duck breast, both halves (skin on)
  • 3/4 cup kosher salt or pickling salt
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon mild paprika
  • 1 tablespoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 tablespoon dried, crumbled oregano
  • 1 tablespoon ground black pepper

 

  1. First a note on the meat. When you breast out the bird, leave as much skin and fat on it as possible; you’ll get these “tails” of skin on both the tail and neck end of the bird if you do, and this is what you want: They will come in handy later. If you haven’t already, peel off the “tender” on the meat side of the breast. Deep-fry in batter and enjoy!
  2. Mix all the spices together in a large bowl. Coat the goose or duck breasts in the mixture well. Massage it into the meat, and make sure every bit of it has cure on it. Pour any extra cure into a non-reactive container just about large enough to hold the goose breasts. I use Tupperware. Place the goose breasts on top and cover.
  3. Cure in the fridge for 1-3 days. The longer you cure, the saltier the prosciutto will be. The saltier it will be, the longer it will keep — but the thinner you will need to shave it when you eat it. A Ross’s goose or an Aleutian or Cackler needs only a day; 36 hours at the most. I give domestic ducks, snow geese or whitefront geese two days. A big Canada or a domestic will need three or even four days.
  4. Flip the breast once a day to ensure even contact with the extra cure.
  5. When it’s done, rinse off the cure and dry the breasts thoroughly. A lot of people will tell you to rinse off every smidge of cure, but I don’t like this — I like the few remaining bits here or there. But you need to get most of it off, and it is imperative that you dry the goose breasts off after rinsing. Let the breasts dry on a rack, skin side down, for an hour or two.
  6. Now it’s time to hang them. You will need a humid place (60-80 percent humidity) that is between 40-65 degrees to hang your goose prosciutto. I keep my curing fridge at 70 percent humidity and 55 degrees. Poke a hole in one of the skin “tails” and either run an “S” hook through it or some string. Hang on a rack so it does not touch anything else for a few weeks.

Snow Goose Stew with Barley and Mushrooms

This is a hearty stew inspired by some similar Russian stews I’ve come across over the years. I imagine it to be something eaten in Siberia, or on Wrangel Island, where many of California’s snow geese spend their summers. I used snow geese in this recipe, but the dish would work with all sorts of meats: other geese, ducks, jackrabbit or hare, muskrats, venison — and yes, domestic beef or lamb.

I also used wild yellowfoot mushrooms, which can be hard to find. If you have access to a fancy supermarket, buy them, or buy beech mushrooms. If that’s not an option, any fresh mushroom will do. Don’t have celery root? Use potatoes. No barley? Rye or wheat berries would also work, although rye takes a long time to cook. No duck fat? Use lard or butter. No duck stock? Use beef stock.

This stew keeps well in the fridge for a week, and it freezes well.

Serves 6-8.

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 3 hours

  • 8 goose legs, about 2-3 pounds
  • 3 tablespoons duck fat, lard or butter
  • 1 large onion, sliced, about 3 cups
  • 1 pound yellowfoot chanterelles, beech mushrooms or other mushrooms
  • 7 cups duck stock or beef stock
  • 2 teaspoons marjoram
  • 1 cup barley
  • 1 cup sliced carrots
  • 1 celery root, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1 tablespoon sour cream per person

 

  1. Heat the duck fat in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat and brown the goose legs well. Salt them as they cook. Remove the goose legs as they brown and set aside.
  2. Once the goose legs are all browned, add the onions and mushrooms and turn the heat to high. Stir to combine. Saute until the onion begins to brown, about 6-8 minutes. Add the marjoram and return the goose legs to the pot, then pour over the duck stock. Bring to a simmer and cook until the goose legs are tender, anywhere from 1 hour to 3 hours.
  3. When the goose legs are tender, remove them, let them cool a bit, and pull all the meat off the bone. Return it to the pot. Add the barley, carrots and celery root. Stir well and cook until the barley and celery root are cooked, about 30 minutes. Add salt to taste.
  4. Serve garnished with dill and black pepper, and give everyone a dollop of sour cream on their bowls when you come to the table.

Nebraska Snow Geese Recipe

Pan-Seared Snow Goose with Wasabi Sweet and Sour Sauce

1. Rub skinned snow goose breasts with oil, salt and pepper and place in a hot skillet with sliced onions and peppers.

2. Brown on one side and then flip over.

3. Add to pan:

  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon apricot preserves
  • 1/2 teaspoon minced fresh or pickled ginger
  • 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon prepared wasabi paste (Japanese horseradish)

4. Remove snow geese when rare to medium rare.

5. Stir in diced mango.

6. Arrange snow goose breasts on black plate with rice.

7. Spoon sauce over breasts and garnish with cilantro and toasted sesame seeds.